Conducting Supplier Debriefings

The Broader Public Sector Procurement Directive entitles unsuccessful proponents participating in a procurement valued at $100,000 or more to a supplier debriefing. A debriefing is an opportunity for a proponent to:

  • discuss with the purchaser the strengths and weaknesses of the proponent’s submission in relation to the evaluation criteria of the procurement;
  • ask questions related to the procurement process; and
  • provide feedback on how the procurement process and the purchaser’s practices could be changed or improved.

A purchaser must include in the documents that initiate a procurement details about supplier debriefings, including the process by which a proponent can request a debriefing. A purchaser must provide proponents with at least 60 days following contract award notification to request a debriefing.

A debriefing should be a process that allows both the purchaser and a proponent to gain valuable input from the other. However, if not conducted properly, a debriefing could lead to additional questions or process-related challenges from a proponent, which would likely mean greater costs being incurred by the purchaser for staff time and legal fees.

To ensure that your organization carries out debriefings efficiently, effectively, and in keeping with applicable regulatory and contractual obligations, your debriefing processes should be formalized to ensure consistency and your staff should be educated on restrictions imposed by applicable procurement requirements and contractual obligations.

DDO is experienced in helping our clients to:

  • establish straight-forward and effective processes for addressing debriefing requests;
  • ensure that their staff are up-to-date on current legislative and regulatory requirements related to debriefings;
  • create an agenda for debriefings that will allow for consistency across debriefings and contribute to the (a) equitable treatment of proponents and (b) transparency of the process;
  • formalize document management and record-keeping procedures for debriefings;
  • train procurement staff on leading a debriefing and on identifying questions that are out of scope of a debriefing; and
  • educate staff on the confidentiality obligations that a purchaser owes to the proponents in a procurement process.

If you are interested in DDO providing your organization with advice on debriefings, or if you have any specific questions related to debriefings, please do not hesitate to reach out to me: mgleeson@ddohealthlaw.com

Now Underway – Consultation on a Future Framework for Palliative Care in Canada

The federal government passed a private member’s bill (C-277), the Framework on Palliative Care in Canada Act, on December 12, 2017. As required by the Act, the federal government is consulting on the future of palliative care in Canada – specifically, in the context of the availability of physician-assisted death. The goal is to develop a framework for access to high quality palliative care in hospitals, home care, long-term care facilities and residential hospices.

According to is website, the federal government is now seeking input from health care professionals across Canada, health system experts, caregivers, people living with life-threatening illnesses, and interested Canadians about their long-term vision for palliative care in Canada, including access, education, support and training for caregivers. The consultation seeks ideas and experiences on the following topics:

  • Definition of palliative care
  • Advance care planning
  • Person and family-centred care
  • Challenges facing people living with life-threatening illness
  • Consistent access to palliative care
  • Special populations (i.e., Indigenous, infants, children and youth, homeless, rural and remote communities, LGBTQ2, people living with disabilities, immigrants and refugees, and others)
  • Health care provider education, training and supports
  • Caregiver training and supports
  • Community engagement
  • Bereavement

This is a great opportunity to have your organization’s voice heard and to give your administrators and health care staff a chance to contribute to the development of public policy.  The voices of health care providers, caregivers and their families are also an integral part of these consultations about the future of palliative care in Canada.

Submissions are due by July 13, 2018 and may be made in writing or on-line.  For help making a submission, please get in touch with me: spalter@ddohealthlaw.com. If you are interested in reading the Act, it is available here: http://www.parl.ca/DocumentViewer/en/42-1/bill/C-277/royal-assent

By December 11, 2018, the report of the federal Minister of Health that sets out the framework for palliative care must be presented to the House of Parliament and 10 days after that the report must be posted on Health Canada’s website.  Watch this blog to stay informed.

 

 

Health Sector Payment Transparency Act, 2017

Status

Schedule 4 of Bill 160 enacts the Health Sector Payment Transparency Act, 2017 (the “Act”). On December 12, 2017, the Act received Royal Assent, but has not yet been proclaimed in force.

Purpose of the Act

The purpose of the Act is to require the reporting of information related to financial relationships that exist within Ontario’s health care system. The purpose is also to enable the collection, analysis and publication of that information in order to, among other things:

  • strengthen the transparency to sustain and enhance patients’ trust in both the health care system and health care providers, and
  • allow patients to make informed decisions about their health care by providing them with access to information.

The Act is similar to the Physician Payments Sunshine Act found in the United States and is the first of its kind in Canada. The Act calls attention to the financial relationship between the medical industry (such as pharmaceutical and medical device companies) and those involved in the health care sector (individuals and organizations) – it creates a regime that requires mandatory disclosure of private sector payments to health professionals. As part of Bill 160, the Strengthening Quality and Accountability for Patients Act, 2017, the Act aims to enhance transparency, accountability, and the quality of care across the health care sector.

Requirements of the Act

The Act requires a “payor” to report to the Minister of Health and Long-Term Care (the “Minister”) information related to a “transfer of value” provided to a “recipient”, whether directly or indirectly through an intermediary. Intermediaries and affiliates may also be required to make reports, if requested by the Minister. The Act describes a payor as any of the following persons if the person provides a transfer of value to a recipient:

  1. A manufacturer that sells a medical product under the manufacturer’s own name or under a trade-mark, design, trade name or other name or mark that is owned or controlled by the manufacturer and that fabricates, produces, processes, assembles, packages or labels the product, even if those tasks are performed by someone else on the manufacturer’s behalf.
  2. A person who fabricates, produces, processes, assembles, packages or labels a medical product on behalf of a manufacturer described in #1.
  3. A wholesaler, distributor, importer or broker that promotes or facilitates the sale of a medical product.
  4. A marketing firm or person who performs activities for the purposes of marketing or promoting a medical product.
  5. A person who organizes continuing education events for members of a health profession on behalf of a manufacturer described in #1.
  6. A prescribed person or entity.

Note other relevant definitions:

  • “Transfer of value” means a transfer of value of any kind, including a payment, benefit, gift, advantage, perquisite or any other prescribed benefit.
  • “Recipient” means a prescribed person, as per the regulations, that receives a transfer of value from a payor.

The Act requires the following information to be reported:

  1. The name of the parties to the transaction.
  2. The source of the transfer of value (if requested).
  3. The parties’ respective business addresses.
  4. The date of the transfer of value.
  5. The transfer of value’s dollar value (or its approximate dollar value, if it is a non-monetary transfer of value).
  6. A description of the transfer of value (including reasons).
  7. Any other prescribed information.

The Act also requires the Minister to analyse the information that is reported for the purposes of health system research and evaluation, planning, and policy analysis. The Minister is allowed to disclose the information reported at least once in a calendar year. Furthermore, the Act establishes a framework for inspections and other compliance mechanisms.

Draft Regulations

In February 2018, draft regulations under the Act were published by the Ontario Government. Details found within the draft regulations include, among other things:

  • a list of 31 persons/entities that constitute recipients, including regulated health professionals; hospitals under the Public Hospitals Act and the Private Hospitals Act; psychiatric facilities under the Mental Health Act (subject to exceptions); a not-for-profit entity that operates a family health team or community mental health and addiction services; a licensee under the Long-Term Care Homes Act, 2007; a College under the Regulated Health Professions Act, 1991; a board member, director, trustee, officer, appointee, employee, or agent of a prescribed entity within this definition; etc.
  • a list of 24 items that are considered reportable transfer of values under the Act, such as cash or cash equivalents, honoraria, compensation for services, rebates and discounts, membership fees, supplies and equipment, food and beverages, travel and accommodation, personal gifts, royalties, etc.
  • the definition of intermediary – a person or entity is deemed to be providing or facilitating a transfer of value on behalf of a payor if the transfer of value originates from the payor (irrespective of whether the payor directs how the transfer of value is to be used by the intermediary or is aware of the identities of the recipients at the time the transfer of value is provided to the intermediary)
  • the monetary threshold for reporting a transfer of value set at $10 or more, and other exceptions to reporting requirements
  • other reporting requirements related to the classification of the transfer of value
  • new entities under the definition of payor, including community pharmacies and laboratories
  • the manner and frequency of reporting – every payor must report to the Minister every year, no later than June 30 in any year after 2019 for the previous calendar year.

Penalties

Penalties will be imposed on individuals and corporations for contravening the Act for each day or part of a day on which the offence occurs or continues to occur. These will range from $10,000-$25,000 for individuals and $50,000-$100,000 for corporations. However, a defence of due diligence is applicable in cases where all reasonable steps were taken to prevent the contravention, or at the time of the contravention, the person had an honest and reasonable belief in a mistaken set of facts which, if true, would have resulted in there not being any contravention.

ONCA Update

The Ontario Legislature passed Bill 154, the Cutting Unnecessary Red Tape Act, 2017, on November 14th. Bill 154 effected changes to non-profit corporate legislation in Ontario.

The Government has announced that it is working to bring Ontario’s Not-for-profit Corporations Act, 2010 (ONCA) into force and effect by early 2020. This aligns with the long-promised 2 years’ notice that the Government would give to the non-profit sector to allow the sector to prepare for ONCA’s arrival. Even once ONCA is proclaimed, non-profit corporations (now governed by the Corporations Act) will have 3 years to transition under the long-anticipated ONCA regime.

Bill 154 also made changes to the Corporations Act – some of which are beneficial to non-profits in Ontario and can be taken advantage of now, particularly related to relaxing the rules around the conduct of members’ meetings.

Bill 154’s changes to ONCA have no immediate impact. Boards are encouraged to keep ONCA on their radar – but no immediate steps are required. Keep posted.

 

Ontario’s new Patient Ombudsman

Recently here at DDO we were discussing the role and powers of the Patient Ombudsman. The Patient Ombudsman has jurisdiction to resolve complaints about health service organizations such as public hospitals, long-term care facilities, and certain services provided by the LHINs.

The Patient Ombudsman is an office of last resort – so people having complaints must first explore resolution directly with their health service organization. When a complaint is filed, the Patient Ombudsman will ensure that no other body has jurisdiction over the complaint and, with patient consent, will try to facilitate resolution by contacting the health sector organization.

The Patient Ombudsman may investigate complaints where a facilitated resolution is unsuccessful. Health sector organizations such as hospitals and long-term care homes will be well placed to respond to inquiries from the Patient Ombudsman if their internal processes for addressing complaints are robust, thorough, and comprehensive.

For more information about the Patient Ombudsman, for help in crafting a robust complaint process, or for help in responding to an inquiry from the PO, please contact me at spalter@ddohealthlaw.com.